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Ethernet over CopperYour Ethernet over Copper Experts

"I never imagined it would be so easy to save. It is like the Orbitz of Ethernet over Copper!"

Jim Green
Ft. Meyers, FL

"My company decided to build a small data center to better service our clients this year and it was my job to find broadband and voice services for our new Help Desk. I'm not a business telecommunications expert, so when I found Ethernet over Copper I was relieved to see that I could sign my company up for service as easy as booking a flight on Priceline. They also provided me with a knowledgeable consultant who helped me fill out the paperwork, port my toll free numbers over, and get everything set up exactly the way we needed. Somehow they even negotiated a free first month of service on top of everything else. If you don't use this service, you don't know what you don't know."

Tyler Evans -- Tempe, AZ

The Future of Ethernet Over Copper

It's common knowledge that Ethernet is going to be the technology of the future. Heck, it's already the technology of today. The real question is how and it's reach in the quickest, most affordable way possible.

copper phone wiresHow did we get all of this copper in the first place?

Many years ago the government, yes - the government, wanted everyone to be able to talk on the phone, so they built a huge network of copper wires over which the phone signals could run.  Much like paved roads, copper became the mainstream conduit that connected every home and business across the United States.  Eventually, the government turned control of the copper network to Ma Bell, and from there to the Regional Bell Operating Companies (Pacific Bell, Bell Atlantic, Bell South, etc.), and from there to what's left over of the RBOCs, namely Verizon, CenturyLink, and AT&T.

The cool thing about copper is: it's everywhere.  Mandated by law to BE everywhere, just like pluming, electrical, and culinary water.  Although we all know that fiber optic cables transmit much more information than copper, fiber is still a private, non-regulated commodity that is only available in the locations where a local ISP could afford to dig up the street, climb a power pole, or whatever it took to physically string the fiber strands into a building.  So, with copper virtually everywhere, regulated (read: LECs must share with other ISPs who want to ride over it), it doesn't take a rocket scientist to see its relevance and importance to modern broadband.

High Bandwidth over Copper Wires

We all know that fiber is important to present and future network architecture.  In fact, many companies have already deployed fiber into their WAN networks. But the cold hard reality is that total "fiber miles" in the United States is still orders of magnitude lower than "copper miles". This trend will continue for many years and billions of dollars, which is what it will take for fiber to reach the point of ubiquity equal to the copper network.  So, as you can see, the existing copper in the ground isn’t dead – far from it.  And with all of the copper in the ground it only makes sense that the best and brightest engineering minds have put their heads together to discover how to deliver high bandwidth over that "legacy" copper network using Ethernet over Copper (EoC) technology. Granted, the technology has it's limits (1800 feet, to be exact), but that is still covers the majority of the good ole' U.S.A.

Copper Holds the Key to Ubiquitous Ethernet

Not to beat a dead horse, but this is why EoC is so important: it is a major key to Ethernet adoption by the masses. The majority of businesses, well - at least small ones, do not have fiber deployed to their office buildings. This wasn't a big deal until recent years when bandwidth utilization exploded (due in large part to Cloud computing and other bandwidth-intensive remotely managed services) and the old T1-TDM technology started to fall short of our increasing bandwidth requirements. EoC, offered by the CLECs (Competitive Local Exchange Carriers) like Integra, XO, Earthlink Business, Windstream, TelePacific (and more) offer speeds from 3Mbps to 100Mbps, which coveres the needs of 80% of the business computing public.  EoC is, and will continue to be, the answer for this sizable and growing market, expanding the traditional capacity of copper - which used to only reach 10Mbps just a few years ago - delivering a plethora of services that would not be available otherwise.

EoC is yet another example of technology revolutions that are hard to predict. Utilizing existing copper connections, state-of-the-art equipment, CLECs can deliver new and innovative services. But which one is available in your home town?  We happen to know - just give us a call at 800-880-2001 and we'll run an EoC analysis for you and present to you the different offerings in a non-biased, easy-to-understand format.  We look forward to helping you capitalize on these recent EoC advancements!

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